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Feast Without Fear: How to Make a Safe Thanksgiving Feast for Your Pet

Thanksgiving is a drool-worthy holiday, but it’s not just people who overeat during the festivities. Pets also may overindulge, and too much of a good thing can lead to a messy outcome, like vomiting and diarrhea. In addition, the Thanksgiving holiday can provide your furry pal with the opportunity to ingest a toxin or an intestine-blocking bone. To avoid a potential Thanksgiving tragedy, give your four-legged friend a feast to remember with the following safe foods instead:

  • Green beans — High in fiber, manganese, and vitamins C and K, plain green beans are great for pets. Feed your furry pal crunchy raw green beans, or keep a can of unsalted green beans in the fridge for a handy treat.
  • Turkey meat — Thanksgiving turkey is a pet’s ultimate dream dish, and while a cooked turkey is safe, there are a few rules to follow. Avoid giving your pet turkey bones, skin, or seasoned meat because these parts can cause gastrointestinal obstructions, internal bleeding, pancreatitis, or toxicity. Stick to small amounts of unseasoned cooked, skinless, boneless turkey breast instead. 
  • Sweet potatoes — Sweet potatoes are packed with beta carotene, potassium, fiber, vitamins A, B6, and C, and many other much-needed nutrients. Feed your pet raw or steamed pieces of sweet potato, and skip the marshmallow-covered casserole.
  • Carrots — Like sweet potatoes, carrots are loaded with beta carotene, vitamins, and fiber, and they’re also a great antioxidant source. Raw carrots make a satisfying crunchy snack, but you can give your pet cooked, unseasoned carrots, too. 
  • Apples — Apples are full of vitamins A and C and contain lots of fiber, making them a healthy treat for your pet. For an easy treat, freeze cubed apples and plain, low-fat yogurt in an ice cube tray. Avoid giving your pet a piece of apple pie, however, because the spices can upset their stomach.
  • Pumpkin — Raw or cooked pumpkins can be a great, fiber-filled snack for pets, but always use fresh, pure pumpkin, not your leftover jack-o’-lantern or canned pie filling. 

With plenty of tasty options, you can easily create a safe and healthy Thanksgiving feast for your pet. But, if they get into your plate or trash can, give our team a call.